Ella likes Huntington. I recently received an e-mail that contained some Huntington quotes about his "salvation experience" (italics added):

"This I am sure of; the doctrines which I have here written are "not after man; for I learned them not of man, neither was I taught them, but by the revelation of Jesus Christ." For I have been some months in the glorious liberty of the gospel before I went to hear the gospel at all; and from this consideration I am warmly attached to the blessed tuition of that great prophet of the church, Christ Jesus my Lord; and do most heartily acquiesce with pious Job, in his confession and question, "Behold, God exalteth by his power; who teacheth like him?" Job, xxxvi. 22."

"...Having been long tempted with such things as those, to drown myself in the Thames, and many more too base to mention, and being at last chased from all confidence in myself-finding my rationality hang long at a balance, and my life in doubt, I was obliged to throw away my Whole Duty of Man, and my Common Prayer also, and betake myself to calling on Christ alone. And, though my prayer was with the words of one desperate, yet, in answer to that prayer, Christ delivered me. My sin, guilt, despair, hardness of heart, envy at God, cavilling at election, fear of death, darkness, ignorance, and unbelief, took their flight at once, and Satan with them. Christ, with all his salvation, beauty, grace, and glory, came into my soul in a minute; for which I hope and trust I shall bless his name for evermore. At this time I had never heard the gospel, nor did I for some months after. I now saw my calling was clear, and my eternal election sure; and for many months my soul enjoyed it."

"After this {conversion}, the hard state of the beasts was represented to me; how hard they fared, and yet they were never to be saved. Many tears of pity I shed over them also. These tender feelings I nursed, and thought I had more mercy than even God himself. Here I felt a heart rising with malice against God, Christ, his sovereign grace, his elect, and all that held election. Long did I carry on this dreadful rebellion against God, and yet mourned and wept over beasts, creeping things, and insects; but no feeling for a suffering Saviour. God left me for a while, to shew me my folly; and folly it is, or I am sadly mistaken...."

"I went so far in this snare as to determine to cast off all hope in God, and to take my lot with the world, supposing that eternal damnation was to be my doom."

So much for the gospel being the power of God unto salvation. Huntington claimed to have been saved months before even hearing the gospel.

Ella is also in league with James North of The Huntingtonian Press that publishes a journal called The Sinner Saved. North claims to espouse the "Experimental Calvinism ... which was preached by men such as ... William Gadsby & J C Philpot ..." This is the kind of trash that a former subscriber to the otc list, Mike Scott, is now into. He's now promoting the "experimentalism" (also called "experientialism") of people like Huntington, Philpot, and Gadsby at his web site. This kind of "Experimental Calvinism" is very big on people's "salvation experiences" such as Huntington's above, in which there is either pre-conversion "Holy Spirit conviction" or a time-lapse between regeneration and conversion or an ignorance of (or even hatred of) the gospel for a period of time after regeneration, or a period of doubting one's salvation due to indwelling sin, or a combination of any or all of these. It's big on the "crying all night on my bed" agony of the sinner who has come under "Holy Spirit conviction." These heretics believe that these kinds of experiences are a sure testimony that the person is a true Christian. It's based on feelings, emotionalism, and mysticism. They're also of the Pedersenite heresy that the Christian's heart is deceitful and desperately wicked (totally depraved).

An example of this is in the latest issue of A Sinner Saved (Summer 2005) in an article entitled "The Lord's Dealings With Paul Avril." Here are some excerpts:

<<On Friday morning, November 24th, 1775, as I was reading in my bedroom, and praying over the Bible as usual, as I was reading and pondering over Revelation chapter 21, I had an amazing sight of the freeness of the grace of Christ from the verses 5,6 & 7; also from chapter 22, verses 16 & 17. ... I was frequently visited with the above passages for many days before, and others like them. They were as honey to my palate. Such were sweet portions of Scripture to my soul ...

But after two or three weeks I began to have some fears that it was perhaps a delusion, that it might be the effects of imagination. These suspicions gave me much uneasiness, trouble, and anguish of soul; but I was enabled to pray so much the more, and to cry louder and louder, as it were, that I might know if it were real or not. ...

On December 27th, 1775, on a Tuesday morning, I heard Mr. Romaine at the Lock Chapel ... The greatness of this Saviour shined amazingly into my understanding, particularly when he quoted in his sermon Rom. 9 verse 5 ...

I was here again most sweetly enabled to cast my soul into the arms of Christ and to find his promised rest, in the pardoning love of God, through atoning blood (Heb. 9:14,15; with 1 Jn. 1:7).

These words Mr. Romaine spake from the Word of God, and others I do not now recollect. O how did my heart burn within me while Christ, by the mouth of the minister, talked with me and opened to me the Scriptures (cf. Luke 24:32). I was set more at liberty, I think, now than before, into the glorious liberty of the children of God; or, rather, I had a stronger manifestation. This is a sermon much remembered by me. ...

For the first two months of this year, 1781, I enjoyed great and sweet manifestations of my Redeemer's love to my soul, but though then I was on the mount, yet at the beginning of March I was brought into the valley of humiliation, for I was sadly beset with my inward corruptions. They were very violent and strong, especially my stubborn besetting sin, which was ready to break out outwardly ... These inward temptations cause me to see, more and more, in the light of the Holy Spirit, the wickedness of my heart, and of my weakness to resist any outward sin, proceeding from a filthy fountain, that I am always afraid of bringing a reproach upon the gospel by my outward conduct. ...

On Lord's Day morning, March 18th, I heard Mr. Romaine, from Titus 3:4-8. ... He observed, "The more you believe, the more peace and love you will have. ..." ... I had sweet and precious meltings of soul under this sermon. It was a sweet, refreshing season to me.

On Sunday evening, the 24th, [Nov. 1782] I heard Mr. Romaine on Romans 1:16. It proved the power of God unto me, as it did that day seven years [ago] for this was the anniversary of the day when my soul was set at liberty. It was not my spiritual birthday; that I look upon to be January 20th, 1771, when, being dead in trespasses and sins, without seeking I was found and unsought for by me, when the Lord first laid hold of my heart in effectual calling; but I was not set at liberty till November 1775. ...

From the beginning of 1771, when I was first under convictions, I would sometimes go to hear legal (moral) preachers, both French and English, but found no comfort at all; on the contrary, only enough to make me quite despair. ...

... Now if I had hearkened to the accusing devil, and my own legal temper and good or bad frames, I should have dropped my shield of faith, and got into the spirit of bondage again to fear, as I pharisaically formerly did; yea, I have much too great legality even now. I would fain go about to establish a little of my own righteousness if I could. God grant that the love of sin and of my own righteousness may be taken out of my heart, that Jesus alone may be exalted.>>

This sounds so humble and pious to the self-righteous "Experimental Calvinists," doesn't it? But, of course, you all can see the insidious heresy in it.

To God alone be the glory,

Marc


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